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Baron Gunther von Reibnitz, who fled to American-occupied Bavaria with his young family in 1945, joined the Nazi party in 1930Princess Michael of Kent acknowledged last night that her father had been an officer in Hitler’s SS. A brief statement was issued by the Queen’s press secretary, Mr Michael Shea, saying that the princess was "shocked" by the revelation in today’s Daily Mirror.The princess was born in the final months of the war to Gunther von Reibnitz, and his wife, Marianna, who had skied for Austria in the 1936 winter Olympics. The couple fled with their baby and her brother, Frederick, into American-occupied Bavaria when the Soviet army approached their estates in Silesia in 1945. Continue reading... Congratulations to the Guardian on its Pulitzer prize ( Guardian wins Pulitzer prize for surveillance revelations , 15 April). Though it is strange how little prominence BBC News 24 gave to the biggest story in the world. The fact that the BBC and the mainstream corporate media have played ideological favourites on its US coverage shows just how vital was the Guardian’s break from the pack on this issue. Gavin Lewis Manchester Continue reading... Richard Caseby | Chimerica director A Comment article about the treatment of disabled people by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) stated: "Forget civil service factual information: Duncan Smith has just hired a Murdoch managing editor from the Sun and Sunday Times as DWP communications director. Perhaps he helps hone Duncan Smith’s terminological inexactitudes." We are happy to accept that Richard Caseby, the strategic director of communications at the DWP, carries out his duties in a thoroughly honest, diligent and professional manner. He was not hired by Iain Duncan Smith, the secretary of state for work and pensions, but works as a civil servant. We apologise for any misunderstanding. In addition, the writer of the article said that "PIP replaces the disability living allowance" (DLA). To clarify: DLA is still available for children up to the age of 16 ( Duncan Smith’s treatment of disabled people is monstrous , 11 April, page 35). Continue reading... The politics of weather; capitalism’s crisis; a Vietnamese baker’s riseThe weather is always a focus while on holiday. How hot will it get? Will it be sunny? What time of the day will that gentle sea breeze blow? So it was last week, taking a long overdue break from my desk here in London.I knew the weather would feature large this week as well, once back in the office, with a crucial report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change . Adapt and thrive, it would seem to me, is the thrust of the report. Put another way, go green to save the planet. You can decide how best to categorise the IPCC findings after taking in our front-page story and double-page spread inside this edition of Guardian Weekly. And don’t miss our editorial cartoon on the subject, courtesy of Martin Rowson , in our Comment & Debate section. Continue reading... Observer, 16 April 1989: Twenty-five years ago, a city struggled to understand why so many lives were lost at a football matchFans returning to the club’s famous Anfield ground wept at the foot of the huge ornamental gates dedicated to the late Bill Shankly, the former Liverpool manager, and topped with the legend ’You’ll Never Walk Alone’.A few wreaths of flowers had been left by well-wishers, and even fans of local rivals Everton came to pass on condolences to the bereaved who stood numb in the spring night. Continue reading... Our taste for music; the loo roll mystery; only in two dimensionsHow and why did mankind develop a taste and talent for music?Primates and mammals also have a developed taste, if not a talent. We had a chimpanzee for eight years who loved ringing a hand bell whenever she had the opportunity, and then of course there are cases of cows yielding more milk when listening to classical music. Dick Hedges, Nairobi, Kenya Continue reading... The Civil Aviation Authority wants to amend a loophole which allows bin-liners and balloons to be registered as aircraft The Civil Aviation Authority has registered more than 400 plastic bin liners as aircraft, entitled to fly in uncontrolled air space. It may also have registered a manhole cover in Cambridge, but it is not sure. The bin liners are fuelled with Calor gas cookers or electric hair dryers and have been given such names as Broken Wind, Hot Pants, and Fat Glenda. They are also causing apoplexy in the aviation world. Continue reading... In the midst of continued public hostility to banks in general, it’s worth noting that Lloyds/TSB has wholly funded our work as an independent foundation for 29 years ( High time for banks to give something back , 9 April). In that time we have disbursed £330m to more than 42,000 small charitable organisations across England and Wales. This work is largely unheralded, unseen and unrecognised but last year enabled us to support more than 800 small charities to help a third of a million disadvantaged people achieve positive change in their lives. Paul Streets Chief executive, Lloyds Bank Foundation Continue reading... Mint newspaper | English Touring Opera | Brendan Gleeson An interview with Melissa Bell, co-founder of the news website Vox.com, described Mint, a business newspaper she helped launch in India, as a subsidiary of the Wall Street Journal. It collaborates with the Wall Street Journal, but is not a subsidiary ( ’There is an opportunity to do journalism differently now ’, 14 April, page 30). Continue reading... The plain shirts of the past have been replaced by stripes, gingham checks and pastels, and these days there are trends in colour and the styling of the collarThere was once no such thing as fashion in shirts but merely shirts - or nearly so. About three years ago the smart young man started wearing striped shirts, and since then fashions have been changing with increasing frequency. The striped shirt gave way to the gingham check, to the plain pastel, and to "today’s biggest selling point - collar styling."According to one of the biggest British manufacturers, Rael-Brook, "The biggest thing that has happened has been the demand for the ’twin-tab’ collar which passes under the knot of the tie... the volume of sales has been fantastic." Tab collars are not really an innovation, for they were popular in the thirties. 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