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What links writer?s cramp, water on the knee, spare ribs, butterflies in stomach, broken heart? Spoiler alert: answers to this and other teasers below (don?t cheat!)1 Sir Hudson Lowe was whose ?jailer?? 2 Which city is served by the Luas tram system? 3 Satire died the day that what happened, according to Tom Lehrer? 4 Kutschera was renamed Rainer in which musical? 5 In what game did Jumpman try to rescue the Lady? 6 Which football club has the highest average attendance in Europe? 7 What ?era? began on 21 August 1935 at LA?s Palomar Ballroom? 8 Liv Ullmann appeared in 10 films by which director? What links: 9 Writer?s cramp; water on the knee; spare ribs; butterflies in stomach; broken heart? 10 Gregor Samsa; David Hedison; Jeff Goldblum? 11 Rwanda and Mozambique (in the Commonwealth)? 12 Johnson; Warner; Saatchi; Lehman? 13 Charm; exaltation; murder; dole; murmuration; skein? 14 Virgin, Child and 11 angels; Richard II, John the Baptist, Edward the Confessor and Saint Edmund? 15 Berlioz dramatic symphony; Tchaikovsky overture; Prokofiev ballet? Continue reading... 100 Buildings, 100 Years | Solidarity in Gda?sk | Compensation for delayed flights | Harold Feinstein? A review of the Twentieth Century Society book 100 Buildings, 100 Years (15 November, page 9, Review) was wrong to say that it was edited by the society?s secretary, Catherine Croft. The book was edited by Susannah Charlton with Elain Harwood from contributions by the society?s supporters, and introduced by Catherine Croft, who is the society?s director, not its secretary.? Kraków was wrongly described as the birthplace of Solidarity in a television preview of an episode of Great Continental Railway Journeys that took its presenter to Poland. Solidarity emerged in Gda?sk under the leadership of Lech Wa??sa ( Pick of the day , 15 November, page 64, The Guide). Continue reading... A reader who has just got back from travelling in Asia likes the Art and design pages and Simon JenkinsI?m 23 years old and have just returned to Britain after 13 months abroad. It?s been a double culture shock to come to London, a city so different from the rest of the UK. My hometown Reading feels a lot further away than 30 minutes on the train.In my time away I had lengthy spells in India, the Philippines and China. The last left the biggest impression. The west could learn good practice from Chinese medicine and a lot from China?s colourful history and traditions. I?ve started tai chi classes in London and it sets me up perfectly for a demanding working week. Continue reading... Since she took over at the gay rights charity, Ruth Hunt has received fierce criticism for being too timid. She talks about life in the the era of gesture politics, the footballers who ask for her help and the battles she still wants to win When the new head of Stonewall first realised she was gay, it was still illegal for her school library to stock a single book that might have helped her understand her sexuality. Twenty years later, she spent this week promoting a campaign against casual classroom homophobia that was endorsed by the education secretary herself. Equality of rights has been achieved with such dizzying speed that there were scarcely any legal battles left for Stonewall to fight by the time Ruth Hunt took charge of the gay rights charity in July. But far from making the job easier, this success only seems to have complicated it.?I think we?re at a stage now where most civil rights movements falter,? she admits. ?You get your full legal equality, which is tangible, it lends itself to the side of a bus, is easily explained in three bullet points. And people think, ?We?ve got that now ? right, we?re done?. That?s the challenge. Because most people would shrug and say it?s over.? But complacency isn?t even her biggest problem. On first impressions, Hunt?s studied confidence suggests unshakable self-assurance ? but she has been deeply unnerved by the gay community?s hostility to any unfamiliar argument. Success has created an expectation of simplistic instant answers, whereas subtlety and nuance do not play  well at all. Continue reading... So Prince Charles thinks he will be well placed to relay public opinion when he becomes king ( Report , 20 November). He has a staff of 124, dresses like his grandfather and hires his own personal airliner (at taxpayers? expense) to fly to Nelson Mandela?s funeral. His favourite pop group is the Three Degrees. I can?t think of anyone better to represent me. David Gerrard Hove, East Sussex? Those writing of the lack of recognition for Tommy Flowers ( Letters , 18 November) may be heartened to know that a street in a new housing estate on the site of the Bletchley outstation in Eastcote, Middlesex, appears to be named after the wizard of Dollis Hill. Andrew Calvert Eastcote, Middlesex Continue reading... We apologise to Bosko Cuic for an errorOn 20 October 2014, Guardian Australia published an article on the Guardian website titled ?Former bikie leader attempted extortion after fight at Serbian Club? which identified Mr Bosko Cuic as being wanted in connection with an alleged drug murder in 2012 and said he was believed to have fled to Serbia. The Guardian acknowledges that Mr Cuic was incorrectly named in the article and that he is not wanted in relation to an alleged drug murder and has not fled to Serbia. Continue reading... Mid Staffs NHS report | Royal Drawing School | Detekt anti-spyware tool | Phone number for T-shirts from the Guardian? An editing error meant that an analysis piece ( Winter crisis looms in the NHS , 19 November, page 13) said last year?s report on the Mid Staffs scandal ?found between 400 and 1,200 deaths potentially due to neglect?. As we said in a correction last August , the February 2013 Francis report on the care provided by Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust did not make that finding. It concluded that it would be unsafe to infer from mortality statistics that there was any particular number of avoidable or unnecessary deaths at the trust.? A piece on the former Prince?s Drawing School being granted a royal title ? it is now the Royal Drawing School ? said this was the first time anything similar had happened since the Royal Ballet School was given the title in 1956. That was the information supplied by Clarence House, but in fact a royal title was granted to what is now the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama in 2012 ( Charles?s school of drawing becomes even more royal , 19 November, page 11). Continue reading... While a Guardian guide to the erosion of public services by private corporations would be very useful ( Letters , 19 November), there is some research already out there on who owns Britain and who sold it. George Monbiot?s 2000 book Captive State: The Corporate Takeover of Britain answers many of Richard Gravil?s questions. Our own book The Trojan Horse: The Growth of Commercial Sponsorship updates Monbiot?s work, and has a useful appendix which lists the key ?providers? and their role in public services. Deborah Philips Professor of literature and cultural history, University of Brighton Garry Whannel Professor of media arts, University of Bedfordshire? Myleene Klass is clearly very exercised by the possibility of a future Labour government giving her rich friends and herself the choice between downsizing or paying a mansion tax ( Miliband bruised in Klass war over tax , 19 November). Presumably she is equally exercised by the current Tory-led government?s offer to those at the opposite end of the financial spectrum of the choice between downsizing or paying a bedroom tax. Professor Jennifer Jenkins Southampton Continue reading... Roger Federer | Athena Swan awards | David Bowie? We were wrong to say that when Roger Federer withdrew from the final of the ATP World Tour Finals on Sunday it was the first time in a career spanning 16 years that he had retired during a tournament. He did so at the Paris Masters in 2008 and the Qatar Open in Doha in 2012 ( Djokovic ends year on a high after Federer?s late withdrawal , 17 November, page 1, Sport).? An article about the difficulties faced by women in academia said that only Queen?s University Belfast and the University of Cambridge had silver-level institution Athena Swan awards for promoting women?s representation in higher education and research in the fields of of science, technology, engineering, maths and medicine. In fact there are three others: Imperial College London, the University of Nottingham and the University of Warwick also have institutional silver awards ( Low pay, brief maternity leave and few senior roles , 18 November, page 42). Continue reading... My father, Peter Whittle, who has died aged 82, was a teacher, diplomat, parish clerk, craftsman, toy-maker, woodworker, puppeteer, beekeeper, poet, playwright, artist, subversive, campaigner, protester and journalist. He was also a Punch and Judy man, department store Santa, fundraiser, public speaker, actor, director, designer, mask-maker, musician, theatregoer and critic. He was a Quaker, and Quakers say: ?Live adventurously.?Peter grew up in Northampton, the son of Cecil, a barber and gardener, and Jessie (nee Fulton), a doll-maker. They moved to Brighton when Peter was 14, and he was introduced in his teens to Quakerism, which became the driving force of a life devoted to reconciliation and peace. He gained a degree in English literature at Brighton Technical College, then trained as a teacher in Bristol, and studied the teaching of drama at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Continue reading...